Books for Emergent Readers- Nick Sharratt

Nick Sharratt has produced a book that even the most reluctant reader is sure to love. It is bright, funny, imaginative and weird all in one.  I have always found that emergent readers just love to dive into this book and read it again and again.  You’ve got to love the title!

This split-page book  allows emergent readers to create their own story by simply turning the flaps. There are just an amazing amount of hilarious combinations for your child to create.  How about a duck in your lemonade?  Fancy jam in your bath? Surely you’d just adore custard on your toes!!!

Once again important  “tricky words” or “Dolch words” are covered ( do, you, like, your) .  You know my thoughts on practicing tricky words by now!  I love that fact that the same 4 tricky words along with “on” and “in” appear page after page. This will really support your child to either learn or consolidate ( know for once and for all 😉 ) these words.

There are some words to test your childs phonetic decoding skills such as chip, toast, bath, toothbrush, powder, ice, cube.  The clear illustrations will provide a visual clue. I would encourage you to get your child to sound out these words anyway. Practice makes perfect and relying on just visual clues will not a proficient reader make. What happens when there are fewer or no pictures?!

My old friend Book Depository is selling Ketchup On Your Cornflakes for 6.88Euro. Please click here for a link.

Not all of Nick Sharratt’s books have such simple text and limited words. I would recommend that you get this one first.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

Advertisements

Even more books for emergent readers!

I have been flicking through my collection of children’s books for the last number of days to find the best ones for emergent readers. My study is full of children’s books and the over flow is between my attic and my parent’s house. I think that perhaps I have a small problem… What do you think?!

I really do love this Nick Butterworth series of books for beginner readers. When I saw that they are on sale at 28% off on Book Depository I just knew I had to review them for you! I think that you will like them too. The title is pretty catchy, eh 🙂

Nick Butterworth has produced a gem of a book for young readers or even preschoolers. The illustrations are big and clear. The text is written in a large font size on a separate, uncluttered page with a white background. All of this helps readers to predict ( clear pictures) and read the story for themselves.

Here is a brief synopsis of what this “fantastic Mum can do”!

It doesn’t stop there!

The book contains lots of Dolch words, many of which are constantly repeated throughout the short book  such as “and, she ,can”.

You may prefer some other titles from Nick Butterworth’s Series that are more relevant to your child and his/her special people. How about…

Book Depository are selling these titles for just 5.43 Euro each with their usual free worldwide postage. Please click here for a link.

Preschool children would also find this book very accessible and fun. The print is so large that your child could learn to “track” . ” Tracking” is the term that refers to the direction in which we read and write print. In our culture we read from left to right and top to bottom. This is not intuitive for young readers and needs to be taught by explicitly pointing to words as we read.  Our eye movements are too subtle to communicate that we are “tracking”. Children also need to learn about the “one to one correspondence” between the spoken and written word. This is that one spoken word ( phoneme) is represented by one written word (grapheme). Ok, enough science for now…

Do you have any recommendations for beginner readers? What is your child’s favourite ? Please leave a comment below and share with us.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

More Books for Emergent Readers

There has been a great response to my post on Bob Books. It seems that lots of you are interested in sourcing stories that your emergent reader can read almost independently. I have had a few tweets asking me to cover more books so here it goes…. Does your child like dogs?!

Emily Gravett is a fantastic author for young children. Here books are big, clear, beautifully illustrated and simply written.

“Dogs” is a very simple story as you can see below. It contains some of those very important “high frequency/Dolch/tricky words” that I keep referring to as being vitally important for developing reading fluency.  In just the illustrations below we see “I, love, and, that, play, won’t”.

The book is also a nice length and would make a great (code for short!) bedtime read.

This book would also be wonderful to read to Preschoolers or as part of an Oral Language Lesson. There is lots of language to explore.

Opposites: big/small, hairy/bald…

Contrasts: stroppy/soppy…

There are lots and lots of  expressive canines in clear, white space on the page, making the text easier to read.  Each dog  tells their own story. There is also a lovely surprise at the end… No, I am NOT giving it away 😉

Dogs is less of a “school reader” format than Bob Books and so may not allow for much “sounding out” but wins on exposure to tricky words, “fun” to read.

Dogs is available from Book Depository for a purse friendly 5.47 Euro. Please click here for a link

Check in later this week for even more book reviews!

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

Jolly Phonics Tricky Words Game (1-25)

“Tricky words” are those that do not follow conventional phonetic rules. Therefore, children need to learn to recognize them instantly by sight.

They are often referred to as “High Frequency Words” / HFW, Dolch or Fry’s. Jolly Phonics always uses the term ” tricky words”.

Dolch Words are a particular grouping of  these tricky words that are sorted by grade, as are Fry 1000 Instant Words. All of these different listings cover broadly the same words but just introduce them in different orders.

No matter what scheme your child follows Jolly Phonics Tricky Words, Dolch or Fry’s, this game will help reinforce words in a fun, active way.

Click here to download

Grab some Bingo chips or Unifix cubes. Make sure that each player has their own colour.

Roll the dice. If you can correctly read a ” tricky word” from that column put down a counter to “freeze” it. The winner is the person who has read and covered the most words!

I am always trying to think up new ways to practice Jolly Phonics Tricky Words. I hope that you like my Jolly Phonics Tricky Word Game. 

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

Jolly Phonics Tricky Word Games 1-20

I have been busy planning another game to help reinforce Jolly Phonics Tricky words 1-20. Variety is the spice of life after all!

I have yet to try out the games with my class but am dying to do so. I am saving them up for my Gingerbread Man unit. I though they were too cute to keep and decided to share them with you guys!

There are a number of different ways to use these cards:

  1. A word treasure hunt
  2. Concentration game
  3. Snap or Old Maid
  4. Flashcards or a Word Wall
  5. Word Headbanz

All of these games are explained in my pack. I have created two for you to choose from: black & white or full colour. You choose!

Please click here to download Black & White Tricky Words

Please click here to download Colour Tricky Words

I hope that you have lots of fun learning and revising these Jolly Phonics Tricky words. Let me know that you think. I just love to get comments!

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

ps Clip art by DJ Inkers

Tricky Words 11-20

I have been busy doing my prep for the week to come. What a way to spend a Sunday, eh?! As my class have been playing with my first set of Tricky Words Bingo Boards for a little while now I thought that it was time to move on. My scheme for this term indicated a similar plan for the week ahead ;).

 Voila! Trick Word Bingo 1-20.

Click here to download Tricky Word Bingo 11-20

Print out, grab your Bingo dauber and off you go!

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

PS. Clipart by DJInkers

Around the World with Tricky Words

My school follows the Jolly Phonics Programme and as part of that I must teach some “tricky words”.  Tricky words are those that cannot be easily sounded out, eg should, little, and must be instantly recognized instead. I don’t have that many commercially bought games to go with the programme as they are beyond my budget. For those of you in the same situation you might like a copy of my Tricky Words Around the World Game! It covers Tricky Words 31-60. Even if your school or child is not covering the Jolly Phonics Programme learning to read these words would certainly speed up fluency 🙂

To play, each child is given one card, sometimes more! The child with the “go” sign starts the game by saying “I have go. Who has only?”. The child with the word “only”will respond with “I have only.Who has old?”. The games continues in a loop until the last child calls “stop”. My class love it and when they are familiar with the words I set a stop watch and they race to beat the clock. It’s hilarious!

 Click here to download!

Cut out the flashcards going across the page so that you have a white and a blue section still attached!   


I hope that you all have as much fun and learning with this game as we do.

Have fun!

Miss Mernagh 🙂