Beginner Phonics for Parents and NQT’s (Part 4)

As promised here is the next checklist to add to your Jolly Phonics collection. This Jolly Phonics checklist features the sounds in sets 3 & 4 of Jolly Phonics sounds.

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Click here to download my Jolly Phonics Checklist.

This Jolly Phonics checklist can be used in 2 ways:

  • What sound is this? (pointing to a phoneme/sound)
  • Can you show me “huh”?

I have also created a record sheet to accompany my Jolly Phonics checklist:

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Click here to download my Jolly Phonics Checklist.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

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For Parents of Junior Infants: Brush up on your (Jolly) Phonics!

This one is especially for parents of children who have just started school. If your child’s school is using Jolly Phonics chances are your child has already begun to learn his or her sounds.

Jolly Phonics is a form of synthetic phonics. This means that it  first teaches the letter sounds and then teaches children to “blend” sounds together to read and write words eg. cat = caat. Blending is often referred to as “sounding out”. Children are also taught to “segment” which involves breaking words up into sounds eg c/a/t. We do this when spelling words.

Your child will probably already have completed the Sounds in Set 1 and perhaps Set 2 at this stage. Here they are:

Click here to download Glance Card

Download this free glance card and save it for when you are doing homework.

You can use it in 2 main ways:

  1. Randomly point to a letter and ask your child what sound it makes.
  2. Call out a sound and ask your child to point it out.

You now have an easy way to check your child’s sounds 🙂 Just remember that it is letter sounds and not letter names that children learn in the beginning.

Be careful when pronouncing these sounds. Think of a simple 3 letter word eg sat and sing it rather than say it! It is easier to hear the constituent sounds if you do.

Here is an explanation of the sounds covered is Sets 1-2. It is always tricky to write down phonetic sounds. I hope that they make sense 😉

“s” is a long sound as in sssssnake and not suh

“a” is a short sound as in a/nt

“t” is a short sound as in t/ap and not  a harsh tuh ( the “uh” at the end in soft)

“i” is a short sound as in it

“p” is a short sound as in pig. It has a very gently “uh” sound at the end. Curl your lips in around your teeth & push them out like a little explosion. The “uh” sound is subtle rather than pronounced.

“n” is a long sound as in nnnnet and not nuh

“c”  and “k” are a short sounds as in cap and kit. It has a very gently “uh” sound at the end.

“e” is a short sound as in egg

“h” is a soft, short sound and not huh. Take a deep breath and sigh to hear it 🙂

“r” is a long sound as in rrrrip and not ruh

“m “is a long sound as in mmmat and not muh

“d” is a soft, short sound as in dip with a quite rather than pronounced uh sound at the end.

I hope that this helps :). It is so important to get it right in the beginning. If you have any further questions please feel free to email me info@missmernagh.com.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

Jolly Phonics Tricky Words 1-30

I have been working on Jolly Phonics Tricky Words 1-30 for a long time now! I am thrilled to be moving on Jolly Phonics Tricky Words 31-60. There are some seriously “tricky” ones for us to learn next term. All those “wh” words will be a challenge( what, when, why, where, who, which)!

Now that we are moving on I need to test each pupil.I also wanted a sheet to include in a Writing Journal so that these words can be correctly spelled in creative writing…

This is what I came up with : Tricky Word Ladders. The Tricky Word Ladders either can be laminated and cut into strips for quick reviewing or put into Home Work Journals for practice.

I also made a Test Card version for those of you who need to keep Pupil Profiles. I will use this sheet and include it  each pupils journal so that parents can see what words require practice.

Click here to download both sheets

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

Sound Identification Sheet

I have been busy testing my new class to see how many letter sounds they remember from Junior Infants. It ‘s a mammoth task but very worth while. I created these cute and incredibly useful sheets for easy testing. Please click here to download both. I laminated them and punched them so they can be kept in my ring binder for ease of use.

Incidentally, the sound sequence matches the letter sound introduction pattern used by Jolly Phonics.

I thought that it was about time that I created a recording sheet to directly correspond with it. I have added some explanations to the image below to help you use the sheet to it’s full potential. These obviously will not appear on your copy!

So here we go: click here to download

I prefer to tick only the unknown when testing children. It  makes it so much easier to read scores at a glance. It also allows you to concentrate more acutely on the child and to document the difficulties that  he/she has or the incorrect responses made. It is also easier on the hand when you have lots and lots of children to test ;).

I will be creating similar test sheets for digraphs over the coming weeks. I think that these sheets are equally useful for parents and teachers. We both have to keep track of how well children are doing and to figure out what sounds to practice that day. By the way, only revise/teach 3 sounds at a time regardless of how many your child did not know. If possible separate out the teaching of those that they reversed eg b and d.

How do you keep track of scores? Have you any clever tips that you could share with us?

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh 🙂

p.s The graphics are by DJInkers and the fonts by kevinandamanda.com