Pocket It template for Combining and Partitioning Number

I posted some photos during the week of my Pocket It template on my Facebook Page. Please hop on over and give me a “like” if you haven’t already done so. I often post photos of what is happening in my classroom on this page. It’s a great way to see what I am up to on an almost daily basis.

Here are some of those photos:

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I use my Pocket It template for Combining/Composing and Partitioning/Decomposing number. Apologies for the duplication of maths terms in the previous sentence. I am conscious that  different terms are used in different parts of the world. Here in Ireland we use the terms Composing and Decomposing. It seems that the U.S and Australia use the tees Combining and Partitioning. I thought I would use both terms as I like to be inclusive :)!

My photos generated some requests for the Pocket It template. It seems that when I originally created it I inadvertently forgot to save the copyright information for the clipart :(. I searched my computer and the internet, but alas they exact images eluded me…

I hate to disappoint so I created a new version of Pocket It, complete with copyright information. So… Here it is…

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I hope that you will love this version too! Click here to download Pocket It.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)

Dolch Word Cut-out sheets

I am a HUGE advocate of teaching emerging readers Dolch Words. As you all know, I am a massive advocate of phonics, but only as part of balanced approach to literacy instruction. Sure, kids need to learn the “code” behind our language so that they can “sound out” unfamiliar words. We also want to develop fluent readers, however, and not the have him/her sound out every word on the page. To do this we need to build up a “Lexicon” or library of words that children instantly recognise and read. Sight words account for a large percentage (up to 75%) of the words used in beginning children’s print materials.
Dolch words offer serious bang for your buck in this regard. There are 220 words in the carefully graded list. (adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs) along with a supplementary list of 95 simple nouns. Ideally, all young readers should learn these words by sight.
I teach the Pre-Primer level to my Junior Infant pupils. We are making pretty good progress if I do say so myself :) I create the following format of worksheet for the first 16 words:

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I am sure that  some of you might find these Dolch Word Cut-out sheets useful with your class or indeed your own child. Please let me know what you think by leaving a comment below. Would you like to see more of these Dolch Word Cut-out sheets for the remaining Pre-Primer words? Would some of you prefer Comic Sans as a font? We teach pre-cursive so these worksheets are perfect for my kiddos. Anyway, let me know your thoughts.

Please click here to dolch word cut out worksheets of Dolch Word Cut-out sheets. Apologies for the typo in the earlier version.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)

More Easter Egg Hunt Printables

Last year I used a different format for our Easter Egg Hunt and it worked WAY, WAY, WAY better. For obvious reasons we will be using the same format this year. Intrigued…? Well then read on!

We held our Easter Egg Hunt inside the school building as we were effectively a building site on the outside. Hiding treats amid the rubble and diggers didn’t seem like such a great idea. As a Green School, we didn’t particularly like having to wrap each treat in a plastic bag before hiding it in the garden. We did so for hygiene reasons but wrestled with the waste that it generated. Finally we had children with dietary needs/allergies that could not eat chocolate. We did not want them finding and munching on eggs. So here was my super-duper plan!

I created blank name tags. I created 2 tags per child. The Students’ Council stuck these tags all around the school. Some were under benches, others on the floor, others still on skirting boards… You get the general idea. Tags were low and accessible to our kiddos. Each child needed to find the 2 tags with his/her name on it. Once found, they cashed them in for treats. This allowed us to ensure that those with dietary needs only got what they could eat. The Easter Egg Hunt also took a lot longer and seemed to be much more enjoyable. The treats we provided were: Easter Themed Rice Krispie Buns, these had jelly beans on top and  easter themed chocolate lollipops. I almost forgot, we gave out ‘Bunny Tail” marshmallows to buzz them up before they started their hunt.

Please click here for your own Easter Egg Hunt Printable name-tags.

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Don’t forget to download and print my free Easter Egg Hunt Printables too.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)

Easter Themed Maths Journal Prompts

I really like using seasonal themes and real-life experiences to bring maths to life. Here are some free  Easter Maths Journal Prompts that you can use this week.

You can see that the first two require more a little more thought and logical processing. I don’t expect all of my kiddos to fly through these ones. I like to use mind benders to challenge children to problem solve using know information to deduce the unknown. These would be great for Senior Infants too!

The final two prompts relate to the topic of Weight. We are exploring that in class at the moment so the prompt is perfectly timed for us.

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I hope that your class/child enjoys these Maths challenges. I can’t wait to start using these Easter Themed Maths Journal Prompts with my class tomorrow. We have already glued in the Easter Bunny prompt so we will hit the ground running tomorrow!

Click here to download my Easter Themed Maths Journal Prompts

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)

Prim-Ed’s Gross Motor Skills Development Activities

I recently found a fantastic Prim Ed resource, Gross Motor Skills Development Activities. It would be an amazing resource for Learning Support Teachers, Resource Teachers, Infant Teachers, Aistear, Pre-School Teachers,  or parents of children with coordination difficulties. Because I love you all so much I have even given you a curriculum match up guide so keep reading!
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Over the years I have taught many children with Dyspraxia and other coordination difficulties. It’s  great to have a resource that you can dip in and out of. Gross Motor Skills Development Activities is very easy to follow and extremely comprehensive:

  • Seven sections  which cover- Spatial and body awareness; Locomotor skills; Ball skills; Equipment; Sensory tables; Creative play; and Games, obstacles and relays

I have to say that the that I will definitely be using Gross Motor Skills Development Activities when I sit down to plan my P.E Scheme next year. It ticks so many boxes in the P.E Curriculum:

  • Creative Movement
  • Travelling
  • Jumping & Hopping
  • Throwing & Catching
  • Rolling
  • Batting
  • Parachutes
  • Hula hoops
  • Skipping ropes
  • Games
  • Obstacles Courses

Here are some samples to whet your appetite:

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We have a few commerically bought scoops but not enough. I will definitely be making my own now that I have read this. Inspired! They would also be much, much easier to catch a ball with. I can start with these homemade ones and then advance to the others. SCORE!

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There are lots of Black Line Masters/BLM’s that would make station teaching so much easier to plan for and set up. They are clear, large and well illustrated:

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In fact, I was sooooo excited to see how useful this book would be from P.E class in general that I sat down and created this!:

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If you would like a copy of my table showing exactly how Prim-Ed’s Gross Motor Skills Development Activities exactly maps onto our P.E Curriculum click here. It will make you planning a lot easier ;) I clearly have too much time on my hands, LOL!!!

Click here to purchase Prim-Ed’s Gross Motor Skills Development Activities or to view sample pages.

For those of you who follow my blog from abroad it is worth noting that Prim-Ed’s Gross Motor Skills Development Activities is available as a digital download. Click here to purchase as a digital download.

Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)

The Gingerbread Man Dolch Pre-Primer Game

Today’s post was heavily requested following the photos I uploaded to Facebook last week. It was a big hit with my kiddos so it should go down well with yours too ;)

I am always trying to create fun ways of learning/practicing Dolch Words. I will be teaching my class to read the Pre-Primer List:

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Click here to download the above sheet from mrsperkins.com

I created the Gingerbread Man game as we were reading it for our story that week. I try to theme teach where possible. I found some fabulous glittery pipe cleaners in the art section of Tesco. The red ones were just perfect for a mouth, after I cut each pipe cleaners into thirds. I also used buttons and mini pop-poms from Mr. Price to allow them to “build” their gingerbread man. I slipped 5 words and fox into my Carson-Dellosa Differentiated Instruction Cubes. Regular followers will be acquainted with my long running obsession with my Carson-Dellosa Differentiated Instruction Cubes! Once they had coloured in their Gingerbread Man, we were all set to play!

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They just roll the dice and read the word The first person to complete his/her Gingerbread Man shouts “Run, run as fast as you can! You can’t catch me, I’m the gingerbread man!”. Rolling a fox is effectively “miss a turn” and the game rotates back the following direction. You should hear the groans and moans when the game swaps direction around the circle!!!

I create the Dolch Pre-Primer words and the Fox to exactly fit my Carson-Dellosa Differentiated Instruction Cubes. You could print multiple copies of the words,  place them face down and have pupils draw a card to play. I would highly recommend purchasing the cubes if you are a classroom teacher!

Here are some photos of the game being played last week I particularly like to one with the sad face. Clever, no?!

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Click here to download the Gingerbread Man sheet (available as colour and B&W)

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Click here to download the game cards for your Differentiated Instruction Cube:

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Have fun,

Miss Mernagh :)